District Looks to New App to Curb Vaping

In+an+to+effort+give+students+an+anonymous+way+to+report+things+like+vaping%2C+bullying%2C+and+violence%2C+a+district+committee+unveiled+an+app+named+%22Anonymous+Alerts%22+at+the+beginning+of+the+school+year.
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District Looks to New App to Curb Vaping

In an to effort give students an anonymous way to report things like vaping, bullying, and violence, a district committee unveiled an app named

In an to effort give students an anonymous way to report things like vaping, bullying, and violence, a district committee unveiled an app named "Anonymous Alerts" at the beginning of the school year.

In an to effort give students an anonymous way to report things like vaping, bullying, and violence, a district committee unveiled an app named "Anonymous Alerts" at the beginning of the school year.

In an to effort give students an anonymous way to report things like vaping, bullying, and violence, a district committee unveiled an app named "Anonymous Alerts" at the beginning of the school year.

Destini Grayer

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In an to effort give students an anonymous way to report things like vaping, bullying and violence, a district committee unveiled an app named “Anonymous Alerts” at the beginning of the school year.

The RISD website says “Anonymous Alerts® allows students or parents to quickly, easily and anonymously report urgent information to school officials.”

Garland ISD previously started using Anonymous Alerts when RISD, along with Assistant Principal Jose Vega and a committee, voted to implement the app.

With vaping on the rise, Vega said he thinks the new app will help to reduce the number of e-cigs being brought on campus.

“The biggest thing right now is the vaping going on – students walking into the bathroom, and walking into a group of people who may be vaping,” he said.

On his way to the restroom last year, senior Miles Maxwell said he saw a group of students vaping.

“Personally I feel like this new app is going to help a lot, because it gets annoying having to wait to use the restroom because kids want to break rules, so now people will stop bringing vapes so they don’t get ISS,” Maxwell said.

At the beginning of the school year a video was shown in class to warn kids about the dangers of vaping and the consequences that come with being caught with a vaping device at school. It also introduced the new app, and how to use it.

“We want to make sure that we’re educating the whole child and not just focusing on that one area of academics,” said RISD Chief Executive Director of Student Services Matthew Gibbins.